More Eyewitnesses Including My Own!

I’ve finally seen a North Alabama Gator!

Unfortunately not in the wild.  But nevertheless, here is PHOTOGRAPHIC PROOF of a North Alabama Gator!

Finally, a North Alabama Gator

Finally, a North Alabama Gator

On Labor Day I took the family to a local safari park… you know the kind, where you drive through and look at free range animals in their, well not NATIVE environment but at least free range.  The exception to the free range rule was the Alligators.  As the only predators in the park, the gators were all kept behind fences and away from the other animals.

The picture above is one I snapped as we drove past.  This particular gator is, I guess, about 6 feet.  Nice and fat and I’m sure does just fine during the winter months. (In fact, I know he does since I asked.  They only collect the smaller gators and their one caiman.  And they had one very small crocodile as well.  But they don’t do anything special with the big gators to keep them healthy over the winter.  Once it gets cold, they stop feeding them, and when the weather warms up and the gators get active they return to feeding.

Better yet, they’ve successful BRED these gators.  They had a two year old in a tank inside the “Planet Reptile” exhibit.  This wonderful park is Harmony Park, and it is my new favorite family fun place in North Alabama.  For $6 a person, you get up close and personal with LOTS of animals.  And I do mean close!

An Emu sticks its head in the car

An Emu sticks its head in the car

So I highly recommend that you take your kids, your date, or whatever to the park.  Click on the link for directions and hours, but the park is closed November to March.

My daughter finds someone slower but not uglier than her father!

My daughter finds someone slower but not uglier than her father!

But I also got another comment about seeing a gator in the wild here in North Alabama.  This one really excites me because its late in the season AND in an area I know.  Here’s the comment form Charlotte.

Just last night around 9pm, we were at the boat launch on Sharp Ford Road in Morgan County and spotted a 5 foot alligator. It was under the bridge appearing to be trying to hide until we shined the light on it. We then watched it as it swam around like we were not even there with the light shining directly on it. There are here. We were considering gigging some frogs but that quickly changed our minds.

– Charolette, September 7th, 2009

Now I know where the boat launch on Sharp Ford Road is.  Clearly they were there at night, which I’ve been told is the easiest time to find a gator because their eyes reflect light so well.  So I continue to get eyewitness reports of gators here in North Alabama.  Here is a map of where the boat ramp is.  It’s the bright white square just north of the road and east of the water.   I’ve actually put the boat in close to there.

So I’m still not sure if I’ll ever see a wild North Alabama Gator, and with my current run in a play, my weekends are sorta full. till the end of September.  So it is unlikely that I’ll make it this season unless September remains unseasonably warm.  But gator hunting 2010 sure looks promising.  And I’ll leave you with some more photos of gators from Harmony Park.

A "little" gator

A "little" gator

There are two gators in there, hard to see in the picture.

There are two gators in there, hard to see in the picture.

More Eyewitnesses and a little help!

So I posted this YouTube video from my first trip in my new kayak this summer.  I got an interesting comment on it today:

dude i fish out there all the time you look like you are out at arrowhead. I see tons of gators back there you just arent in the right spot. the second week in April is the best time to find them they are out in the open getting there first meals. Cool to watch.

guitarshredder849 via YouTube

Besides checking out his shred video on YouTube, it seems he spins a rod as well as shredding guitars.  So he’s given me a place and a time to look for the elusive North Alabama Gator.

But this shows me that this cryptid is clearly not elusive to the locals.  In fact, it seems that it is a nuisance to them, which is a shame.  I got another comment here on the blog that made me quite sad.

I have seen several gators at wheeler NWR. I have seen several babies 6-8″ long and one about 8′. one about 5′ and a couple about 3′. Flint Creek on the south side of the River is a good place to look as is Limestone cove near Mooresville. Part of the problem is that the locals shoot them whenever they get the chance. So if a gator is not shy it is quickly dead!! Gators are sneaky and will lie at the surface with just their eyes showing. I found two babies that were dead with their tails missing.

-Tom via WordPress

If locals really are killing the gators, I’m quite upset.  These are still federally protected critters, even if they are out of their “normal range.”  If you’re caught killing a gator in Alabama without a tag, and there are NO tags given for hunting them in North Alabama, the fine is pretty high and is a felony under federal law.

I think what Tom is calling Limestone Cove is what I’ve come to call Limestone Bay.  It is a large backwater near Mooresville, Alabama.  I’ve not tried Flint Creek yet, it’s an extra 30 minute drive or 60 minute paddle from my home base, and since I often just get a few hours, I haven’t gone there yet.

Now guitarshredder849 speaks of Arrowhead, and that’s the boat launch on Limestone Bay/Cove.  So that’s two people who’ve given me tips to try that area.  Earlier this summer, I got this:

Hey just stumbled on your blog and can tell you with certainty that there are gators in the limestone bay area. Somewhere around 2001 or 02 I caught one while fishing in Limestone bay at night. It was a farily small one about 2 feet at the most. I hear about some others but that it the only one that I have actually seen personally. Blackwell Swamp is also said to have some but I have yet to see one there even after a lot of hours canoeing over the years there. Good luck with finding one.

-Matthew via WordPress

There’s that Limestone Bay area again.  I’m liking Limestone Bay more and more for my future gator hunts.  But that’s not the only tips I’ve been given.

Wheeler is where they are. I am an avid kayaker with wheeler in my backyard. Cotaco creek off upper river road in somerville is where i see them the most. Day or night. You can also access the remote parts of the creek from AL HWY 36 in Cotaco. I know for a fact a 12-14 foot gator stays there.

-Jansen via WordPress

I’m not familiar with Cotaco or Somerville, so some time with Google Maps is in order.  But I do know where HWY 36 is, so I think I might have a general idea where he’s talking about.  I’ve tried emailing Jansen, but haven’t gotten a reply so far.  I’ll hit him up again and see if he can give me better directions.

I also got this one:

I know for a fact there are aligators in north alabama. My family and i have been camped out in Mallard Creek camp ground and saw a gator. The manager of the camp ground warned us about feeding the ducks because he had spoted a gator between 10 to 12 foot long. Try the areas around mallard creek and fox creek in Lawrence and Morgan county

-Meagan via WordPress

I’m even less sure about Mallard Creek than I am about Cotaco.  Funny, I’ve lived in Madison County, Alabama all my life, but I’ve learned more about the local geography since getting my canoe.  And I’m learning even more since getting interested in gators and getting the kayak.  Life is funny sometimes!  Plenty of leads and new places to look!

But the weather here in North Alabama has clearly shifted.  While it is still getting a bit warm late in the day, the temps have fallen enough that I’d imagine the gators are starting to go dormant for the winter.  I may get lucky and find an active gator over the next couple of weekends, but I doubt it.  Not that I won’t try!  I’m thinking a trip to Cotaco or Arrowhead is in the offing for this weekend. (No gator hunting trip this weekend.  I’m also in a play, and seems our technical director won’t be in town to build the set on the stage.  Just been drafted to do that instead of something I want to do.)

Last weekend I went out to “the bottoms” where another commentator had sent me a picture his wife had taken of an estimated 10 foot gator.  I looked for a while from shore, but I wasn’t as lucky as they were.  I’ve yet to spot a gator there, but I tell ya what…  if ever there was a spot that SHOULD have a gator, that’s it.  It looks like something in Louisiana instead of Alabama.

Kids are Amazing Creatures

Kids are pretty amazing. I took my kids out for a day on the river, and they went along fairly happily. We went down to a place on the Tennessee river where I spent a few hours in a cave hiding from a thunder storm a few weeks ago. The kids wanted to see the cave and so we went.

The trip to the cave was uneventful. We saw some fish, a turtle or two, and lots of boats. In fact, my only concern was some idiot motorboater (is my bias showing?) running us over.

But that didn’t happen and we had a grand time. We scrambled up into the cave, hung out a bit and the kids wanted to try some swimming.

The swiming didn’t go well. The girl, my four year old, hurt her knee and the boy, my six year old, got scared when he realized there was no shallow water.

DSCF0445.JPG

I tried go coax them back into the water by going swimming myself. I dived from the cave and swam out a bit. I turned to try and coax the kids into the water but they wanted none of it. The girl was still crying over her hurt knee. The boy thought there might be snakes. I looked downriver and no longer cared. A big thunderstorm was heading our way. Looked like we’d be spending some more time in my weather cave.

Problem was, unlike the first time, this storm didn’t want to die. It kept on for more than an hour. Then pushing two. I had no clue when it would end. So after the thunder stopped we started looking for a break in the weather to dash the quarter mile from the cave back to the car.

Jim and Sean

The problem was that quarter mile was across open water that was rolling with wind induced waves. Big waves. So we waited. And looked for a pattern. And when I thought I found it I threw the kids in the canoe and took off across the river.

My friend, Jim, had taken my kayak out with us. I found comfort in the fact that if something went wrong and the canoe rolled over, Jim was there with the kayak to grab a kid.

We’d pulled the kayak up in the cave when the storm really started because it is more likely to have trouble with to much water in it. The canoe stayed tied up outside the cave. So when the kids and I where in the canoe, we headed off while Jim had to put his boat back into the water, scramble aboard and set off.

We’d picked a point in the rain when the wind and most of the waves had died down, the rain was slacking and we had a good chance of crossing. I got about 100 yards from the cave and could get a good look downstream.

The Cave

Moving in fast was a wall of water. In front of that was wind driven waves and I knew it was going to get rough. I hoped it was far enough downstream that we could get across before it hit. I screamed over my shoulder to hurry Jim up and paddled hard.

We didn’t make it. The winds in front of that rain came in quick and pounded into the canoe. I yelled to the kids to lay down in the bottom of the canoe. The lower the weight, the more stable the canoe. The winds were pushing me hard, and the best I could do is quarter the wind and cross against the current. The wind still managed to push me far off course, about an eighth of a mile upstream.

My kids, however, thought we were having a grand time. They thought the waves were fun, the rain a hoot and the wind exciting. I, however, was convinced that they were going to panic, the canoe would flip and I’d be in trouble. That didn’t happen. They giggled and teased each other, but stayed low and still all the way across. They were brave little troopers. They made me quite proud!

Of course after getting back to the car, loading both boats onto it in the pouring rain, and dripping wet, Jim and I got in the car and started to leave. Which is EXACTLY the moment the sun came out!

Still a fun day, and the kids actually enjoyed the trip.

Photographic Proof

I now have photographic proof alligators in North Alabama. Unfortunately the photo isn’t mine.

That is a photograph sent to me by a commenter on this site, taken very near to my first kayak trip on Wheeler Wildlife Refuge. Here is the comment he left me:

“Runwolf, If you really want to see a pic of a North Alabama gator, I have a couple that my wife and I took of about 10 footer on June 25 of this year. I’ll gladly send them to you if you leave me your e-mail address.”

I wasted no time emailing Mr. King asking for the location and a copy of the photo. He sent me the above picture, credited to his wife. He also gave me permission to use the photo here. He was, however, not interested in giving me the location.

I can understand this. The Kings are nature photographers. And they jealously guard there locations like fishermen. I get that. So I asked him again, in a more general way, for information. Here is his response:

“Mike, I don’t normally give out specific locale info but you seem like a cool guy with a lot of enthusiasm. You can’t be too careful these days. They are magnificent creatures and I just want to be sure they are not harmed in any way. I hope you understand. I enjoyed reading your blog. Sounds like you have been in the right spots. I think some days they are probably more visible than on other days. I have definitely heard from reliable sources that the east side of Limestone Bay has a population of gators. Just keep looking. The two gators we have found personally have been a place this blog owner has redacted. One was in the creek that flows through there. The one we found a few days ago was actually swimming in that tupelo tree stand. We have photographed a lot of cottonmouths from there too, so keep an eye out for them. Just please don’t kill any. Did I mention we are snake lovers? LOL.”

Now my first trip via canoe into the Refuge was in Limestone Bay. I was in the Northwest, so I will be going east next time I visit. This is where I think I saw a year old gator but can’t prove it.

As for the place I’m not telling you about until I get a picture there, I was in that stand of trees not two days after the Kings took their picture! Two days! I very well could have been within hundreds of yards of that very gator!

***UPDATE***  I was NOT there two days after the photo.  I was there four days BEFORE the photo.  My mistake.  Two days after I was dealing with a different kind of wildlife in Tell City, Indiana.  I’ve been working on a post about that and will have it up sometime this year.  But it has very little to do with Alligators.  ***END UPDATE***

Mr. King estimates that gator at ten feet. I have a very good idea of exactly what ten feet looks like. It is how long my new kayak is. While clearly not a monster gator, it is nothing to mock. Let me show you what a ten foot gator looks like.

That’s my son sitting in my ten foot kayak on the floor of Gander Mountain just before we bought the kayak. I think it provides a nice image of what a ten foot gator looks like.

I have no doubt that the camera used by the Kings is far superior to my own camera. I keep my gear light, small and waterproof. I use a small Fujifilm FinePix Z33WP waterproof camera with a 3x optical zoom. (Mine’s that cool green color) At full zoom it is the equivalent of a 105mm lens on a 35mm camera. I suspect that I may have to get a bit closer to get a similar shot.

And gators aren’t just willing to wait around for their picture to be taken. Mr. King didn’t mention how they arrived at their spot but I suspect they hiked. As I am a paddler, I suspect my boat may be making my efforts harder. I’m sending vibrations through the water at speeds greater than sound warning gators of my presence long before I arrive.

In fact, this same gator may have heard me, submerged and been within a dozen feet of me and I wouldn’t have known it. And gators can remain submerged for a long time. 10-15 minutes is easy. 2 hours is possible.

So patience, Runwolf. Patience. Go slower, stay longer. Plan better. Your goal is out there.

And to Mr. King, I promise to leave your precious snakes alone. As long as they stay out of my boat. Then, all bets are off.

And thanks for the picture. Now to get one of my own.